How Much is Hugh Jackman Lifting? Is the Pic Real?

A few people have asked me whether the Hugh Jackman dead lifting pic is real. I have no idea why it would be fake. Sure, Hugh Jackman is Wolverine and not a Spartan, but he’s still pretty jacked and clearly hits The Weight Room.

(Click on pic for larger image of Hugh Jackman deadlifting.)

Hugh Jackman lifting weights

Yes, the pic is real. You can tell it’s real based on the way the bar is bending. An ordinary Olympic style barbell bends once you have 315 pounds (or “3 wheels” as the bros say) on it.

How much can Hugh Jackman Lift?

Jackman is using Olympic bumper plates. They are called bumper plates because you can drop them on an Olympic lifting platform without damaging anything.

A standard red bumper plate is 45 pounds; a blue plate is 35 pounds. He is also using steel hexagon plates. He has one 45 pound plate on either side plus what appears to be a 10 pounder.

Given that a standard Olympic barbell is 45 pounds, Hugh Jackman is dead lifting 405 pounds.

In bro speak, we call that “4 wheels .” That is an impressive deadlift, especially when you consider Hugh Jackman’s age.

Hugh Jackman is 44. He knows how to stay fit over 40.

Does Hugh Jackman used anabolic steroids? Steroids are used in Hollywood.

Only he knows for sure, although it would be shocking if here were not on testosterone replacement therapy and using pharm grade human growth hormone.

We are entering a brave new world. Either be a steroid-hating dork or start learning some science.

Read next: Things Internet Geeks Don’t Know About Steroids.

UPDATEReds are 45 and blues are 35. Unless they are Rogue plates (pictured below). Either way, nice deadlift, bro!

Rogue bumper plates

  • YouSoWould

    Good for his age, credit where credit’s due.

    But seriously though, look at the dude’s legs. They look like they’re about to snap. Evidently squatting doesn’t play a large part in his regime.

  • MadMav

    I am 47 and can deadlift 315# with ease. my goal is #400 by the end of this year.

  • MattW

    I’m no weight expert, but I believe the two reds the blue and the 12 sided black are all 45s. Then there’s a small 12 sided black as well which looks like maybe a 5. That’s 415lbs.

  • Constantine

    Impressive. Even lacking muscular density, its steal a feat. He is certainly a hard worker.

    Im 36 and I deadlift 150 Kg (approx 330 lbs). I am conservative when it comes to deads and squats because of previous injuries but since I intend to participate in the local crossfit games soon, I am prepared to fall in action…

    I have been lifting since 1992. Age is a factor as I feel my bones and tendons more and more. But with proper supplementation you can maintain formidable energy and appearance.

    Extreme Kudos to MadMav. I aspire to keep my lifts at that level at your age. My national guard reserve captain is 46 and deads 400 x 5 but to be honest I consider him a freak! (and a bastard…).

    Danger, give us a workout and let us post weight and time. It should be fun!

    • StS

      Hey Constantine,

      As I am not the youngest myself anymore, I am grateful for advice concerning proper supplementation for bones, joints, cartilage and tendons. Do you take anything special apart from the standard “bone and joint” capsules the usual stuff?

      • Constantine

        I am not qualified to give such advice. Im the ordinary fitness enthusiast.
        All in all I try to maintain a good standard of health.In addition to the standard bone and joint capsules, I take Devil’s claw, Fearfew and Ginger. Generally, I maintain the traditional mediterranean diet. Its easy for me, because everybody cooks this way in this corner of the world. Emphasis is placed on organic fish, vegetables and fruits, every meal is a small gathering, eat slowly, etc. I do not consume junk food and avoid sugars for all the known reasons. I am an avid user of kalamata olive oil and I avoid all vegetable oils.

        I eat loads of yogurt, natural honey, carob honey, tahini and nuts. My pre and post meals consist of a variant of these. This way, I have a good amount of energy to get me through the day.

        I take a post workout supplement, most good brands carry similar products. I find that since my energy is restored (thus maintained through out the day), I am more inclined to keep a proper posture, thus not loading my muscles and joints unnecessarily.

        Inevitably, during low energy days, injuries become difficult to deal with.

        I do a 15 minute yoga routine every morning. I get the joints “oiled up” early on for the rest of the day.

        I always warm up with an adjusted yoga routine. I know that there are conflicting views about pre workout stretching, but I am so hurt that I will sacrifice any loss of strength for the sake of prevention.

        I adjust my workouts with my martial arts training in mind. I lift heavy once every 5 days during winter and once every 7-10 days in the summer due to the heat. This is my personal preference, not necessarily based on science but rather on what does not hurt me unnecessarily. From time to time I get cocky and try to raise the weight. Sometimes I succeed, other times I get hurt.

        I also prefer to have at least one yoga-pilates workout per week. It is a good “oiling of the joints” workout and if the good health of your tendons, cartilage and joints are high in your priority list, then you should give it a go.

        I also visit a masseur and a chiropractor once a month.

  • ChristopherFS

    I think he’s lifting about 463lbs. Red bumpers are usually 25kg, blue bumpers are 20. That’d be 140kg + 155lb. 140kg is about 308lbs.

  • The Chrome Microphone

    No gloves too

    Like a savage

    My hands were callusing up from the measly 309 I pulled this morning

    If Hugh Jackman slaps a bitch he’s taking some skin with him for sure

  • Manny

    I remember seeing this pic.

    It’s making the rounds on the internet weightlifting forums.

    The hater comments are just absurd. Lots of people saying that it’s “not that impressive.”

    Sounds sort of like the “elbows too pointy, definitely wouldn’t bang” comments that are all too common among these parts.

    • Danger & Play

      Or people will say he has small calves. That comment only reveals how ignorant the hater is.

      Calf size is largely genetic. Jackman has terrible insertion points. There’s nothing he can do to build those “chicken legs” up.

      • http://www.SkinnyFatTransformation.com Oskar @ SkinnyFatTransformation.com

        I agree on the fact that calf size is largely genetic. I added close to 200 lbs to my squat and 300 lbs to my deadlift during my first year of training and my calves remained the same. 3.5 years later, they’re still skinny even though I’ve tried to train them directly.

        By the way, the blue plates are usually 45 lbs which makes it even more impressive.

        Gotta watch the new Wolverine soon!

        • Danger & Play

          Just checked out your site. Great progress man.

          • http://www.skinnyfattransformation.com Oskar @ SkinnyFatTransformation.com

            Thank you I appreciate it.

            I only follow 3 blogs and your blog is one of them, keep it up!

  • BlackPoisonSoul

    Mmmmmmmm at 47 years of age I can manage 120kg – then my hands cannot grip the bar. Once I can sort the grip-problem, my dead lift should improve.

    Good to know this info, thanks!

    • The Chrome Microphone

      Try no gloves, chalk and a mixed grip

  • Cosmos

    For anyone who spends time around serious lifters at the gym it is not hard to believe. I am younger (28) but I could pull 1×415 after about 1.5 years of gym work, no gloves, at 5’11” 175-185 lbs. Prior to returning to the gym, all I had done was high school sports, which I wasn’t even good at.

  • http://www.strengthbysonny.com Strength By Sonny

    would you expect anything less from wolverine?